cultivating & crashing

an organic collection of notes, observations, and thoughts

Tag: internet

A catalogue of contemporary anxieties

This piece by Aaron Straup Cope is one of the best things I’ve read in a really long time. It’s my days reading and « filosofando » about the world and how it works, updated to today with its technological trappings and philosophical ramifications, the ones we don’t quite understand yet. Just read it. And then re-read it.

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Baba ganoush and internets

2 eggplants
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/4 c lemon juice
1/4 c tahini
1 1/2 T olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Cut eggplants lengthwise, salt, let sit for an hour. Rinse, then bake in oven at 375F for an hour or until very soft. When cool enough, strip the peel off (if it’s messy, you’re doing it right). Process with other ingredients.

I spent a good two hours helping my mom set up a guest account for my little sister to use and dealing with the emotional aftermath (little sister freaked out because she can’t chat on my mom’s Skype account anymore). It’s moments like these, when I’m researching the best way to add parental controls to a computer while explaining to my mom how to disconnect the wifi on her laptop, that I realize that I’m helping my mom be a parent to my younger siblings, that the graphic and anarchic aspects of the Internet really are scary and make one feel impotent in the face of them, and how easy it is to fall into wanting to control, to block everything out instead of teaching a little kid how to deal with it intelligently and trusting her to do exactly that. I think I did a good job explaining to my mom that she’s going to start to use the Internet on her own eventually, and that she should probably be allowed to use it for pleasure for a while instead of having her sneak around while she’s supposed to be doing homework. Either way, the Internet is likely the least terrible thing she’s exposed to, but it’s difficult to convey that to the old guard.

The Internet, postmodernity, and justice

Quick thought because it’s finals.

Last night I found this article in the Guardian about Anonymous taking on Rehtaeh Parsons’ case fascinating. Today I’m  reading about how documents from Wikileaks are being used in court to prove the Argentine military’s involvement in a massacre that took place in Rosario in the 1970s; the leaked document communicates to the US embassy how the military was planning to pass on the “credit” for the massacre to the federal and provincial police forces (El Esquiu).

I’ve wondered how justice would function, what justice would look like, when postmodernity had seeped its way into it. These cases represent a shift in bodies/forms of power which are now in contact with and being influenced by an organization like Wikileaks, which facilitates the anonymous collection of information and harnesses new technologies of the Internet to have truth wreak havoc on those who hide it. Anonymous does similar things, but is more anarchic given its extensive trolling for the lulz. The Guardian’s article does an great job of showing how fragmented, imperfect, and strange it is when decentralization creates power that can challenge governments and their traditional power. It’s exciting to watch this happen, and I wonder how North American society will change because of it. In a world that, for the time being, is much more panopticon than 1984, I wonder whether this new kind of power will grow, whether it will come to be a normal part of how cases get mobilized, whether the novelty will wear off and—like libraries, and the Internet itself—will soon just be a place where little happens beyond meeting limited, personal needs like finding a book or instant messaging friends. Or I wonder whether North American governments will evolve to clamp down on the openness of the Internet, slowly offing the rugged hacktivist pioneers of the world wide web, turning “offenders” into informants. Not just today, but in ten, fifty, a hundred years from now.

I really hope someone out there is doing a master’s (or sci non-fi) on this, and that I can find it to read it. Or maybe this is the kind of topic Mike means when he says I could go into theory.

Baauer’s Harlem Shake

Con los terroristas
Ey Shake
Ey Shake

Ey
Ey

Ey
Ey

Shake
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
Ta
And do the Harlem Shake
Ey Shake
Ey
Shake
Shake
Ey
Shake
Shake
Shake

Ey
Shake
Ey
Shake
Ey
Shake
Ey
Shake

Con los terroristas
Ey
Con los terroristas
Ey
Ey

 

I want for someone to write a thesis on the Harlem Shake as an artefact of our postmodern world. In the interim, I leave the world to be inspired by its lyrics.

ChatRoulette

That is seriously the scariest shit I’ve done in a while.

I lasted 4 seconds.

no more Muzak

I’m going to start keeping the cool webby things Christine passes along to me. First one here:

Fresh Hot Radio: a web-native electronic music internet radio. [Warning: Some songs suck, so skip to the next one if needed.]

Is there such a thing as public domain music? Is there a mechanism similar to the death of author + x years? Then we could have more than just electro music, which can be good but can also make some people want to blast their brains out. I know there are artists who’ve decided to ditch the conventional licenses, allowing people to pirate their music legally, and have decided to make their money touring (I’m thinking of Ani DiFranco, Radiohead, and some metal band I can’t remember now.); the logic is that people are pirating anyway, so instead of condemning them, they see it as a way to get more people hooked on their music, which will translate into more people buying tickets to see them live, merchandise, et cetera. Would it be feasible to make a radio like this with their music?

Making music public and more easily available would challenge the hegemony of mainstream music, and perhaps make more room for more artful and and talented people to get out there and better known. It would make all music folk music, and would fail to put the interests of the audience at odds with the interests of the musicians. So-called piracy, like abortion, could use some rethinking to re-evaluate its causes and context, and some creative thinking to make it properly and responsibly used, rather than unsafe and illegal.

Oh.

Let me guess: the Internet makes it even easier for the C.I.A. to get a load of what individuals are up to, eh?

Dammit!

(B)log On at the CCA

Notes on yesterday’s talk.

theresa’s idea about archiving: we are very concerned with immediacy, at the cost of the lasting importance? how does this relate to the future? should it? I would also find it telling that we do this because we live in now forgetting our lives at the same time that we forget the bigger picture of living well in the now because we are working towards the big picture of educated, high-salaried life later on or whatever it is that we are going for. Keep reading